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Last week, a convoy of trucks carrying Avro Lancaster FM104 arrived at the British Columbia Aviation Museum near Victoria International Airport in North Saanich, Canada.

The bomber was originally built by Victory Aircraft of Malton, Ontario in 1944 and, installed along Toronto’s waterfront following its retirement from the RCAF in 1964. In 1999, it was moved to a museum in Downsview Park, where a restoration effort began. However, it was relocated once again when the museum closed in 2011. The machine has spent recent years in storage at Edenvale Aerodrome west of Barrie while its future became a topic of debate.

In July, the museum became the successful bidder and, now having formally taken possession of the machine from the city of Toronto, the “long process of restoration” will begin. The work will be carried out in cooperation with Victoria Air Maintenance and will focus on returning the machine to flying condition. The machine’s components will reportedly be on public display throughout the process.

Click below to check out photos of FM104’s arrival at its new home.

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The British Columbia Aviation Museum in North Saanich, Canada has announced the acquisition of Avro Lancaster FM104 from the city of Toronto.

The bomber was originally built by Victory Aircraft of Malton, Ontario in 1944 and installed along Toronto’s waterfront following its retirement from the RCAF in 1964. Now in need of extensive restoration, the machine has spent recent years in storage at Edenvale Aerodrome west of Barrie while its future became the focus of debate.

The Lancaster will be relocated to the museum, located near Victoria International Airport, over the next few months. Restoration will reportedly commence immediately with the goal of returning the machine to airworthy condition in partnership with the a team of vintage aircraft restorers at Victoria Air Maintenance.

BC Aviation Museum President John Lewis states: “I am pleased that many local aircraft manufacturing specialists and vintage aircraft enthusiasts have pledged their time and knowledge to volunteer on this project. Many people at the BC Aviation Museum and the Victoria aviation community have worked hard to make today’s announcement possible. We are now looking forward to the day when Lancaster FM104 goes on display at our museum.”

(via British Columbia Aviation Museum Photo: airforcefe via Wikimedia Commons)

The future of Avro Lancaster FM104 could be determined by a meeting held today.

The bomber was built by Victory Aircraft of Malton, Ontario in 1944 and installed along Toronto’s waterfront following its retirement from the RCAF in 1964. In 1999, it was moved to a museum in Downsview Park, where a restoration effort began. However, it was relocated once again when the museum closed in 2011 and has since been stored at the Edenvale Aerodrome west of Barrie. The aircraft is now said to be in need of extensive restoration.

The future of FM104 has become the focus of significant debate. The city of Toronto is said to lacks the funds, resources and space to properly maintain and display the machine and would like to donate it to the British Columbia Aviation Museum near Victoria, as it is said to be well equipped for its long-term care. However, the group FM104EVER is against the proposal, viewing the Lancaster as an important part of the local community. The team is working to keep the aircraft in the city and has reportedly assembled a team of experts to restore the aircraft while also identifying potential sites for display.

The city’s Economic Development Committee met today to consider the proposals. Click below to watch.

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The city of Toronto has issued a response amid growing public calls to save Avro Lancaster FM104.

The aircraft, which now sits in storage at the Edenvale Aerodrome west of Barrie, was built by Victory Aircraft of Malton, Ontario and installed along Toronto’s waterfront following its retirement from the RCAF in 1964. In 1999, it was moved to a museum in Downsview Park, where a restoration effort began. However, it was relocated once again when the museum closed in 2011.

The removal of FM104 from display has been difficult for some to accept, as it is seen as a connection to the city and a way of remembering veterans’ service and sacrifice. However, calls for the bomber to be saved grew louder when it was recently reported that the city was seeking to dispose of it. [click to continue…]