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Earlier today, Avspecs Ltd’s latest de Havilland Mosquito project, ZK-FHC, took to the skies for its first post-restoration flight.

The flight was performed by David Phillips and Keith Skillings from Avspecs’ base at Ardmore, New Zealand. The Mosquito reportedly flew for a half hour along with a Spitfire which acted as a chase/camera plane.

As previously reported, the aircraft is a TIII trainer restored for the Flying Heritage Collection based at Paine Field, Washington State and is painted in the colors of NZ2337/TE757, a Standard Motors-built Mossie that was destroyed in a hangar fire at Ohakea in 1950.

The aircraft is expected to be dismantled and shipped to the United States shortly.

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A de Havilland Mosquito project currently underway at Avspecs, Ltd. in New Zealand is nearing its first flight and recently performed initial engine tests.

According to company co-founder Warren Denholm, final inspections will take place with test flights expected at the end of the month.

The aircraft, previously TV959, is a TIII trainer being restored for The Flying Heritage Collection based at Paine Field, Washington State, and will be dismantled and shipped following flight testing at Avspecs’ base at Ardmore. It was previously held by the Imperial War Museum in the 1960s and appeared in the movie 633 Squadron in 1963.

Click below to watch video of a recent engine test.

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With support from John de Havilland, descendant of Geoffrey de Havilland and Philip Birtles, President of the de Havilland Aircraft Museum, the newly established Mosquito Pathfinder Trust has made it their mission to restore a de Havilland Mosquito and return it to the skies over the UK.

The Somerset-based organization’s selected aircraft is a Mosquito Mk.IV built by de Havilland at Hatfield and delivered to the RAF in early 1944. It served with 618 Squadron at various locations and was later modified to a Highball configuration in order to test mini bouncing bombs. Following the end of WW2, the machine was relocated to Australia and based at RAAF Narrowmine, eventually being acquired by a restorer from New Zealand. [click to continue…]

On Friday, the Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum’s (FHCAM) newly restored de Havilland Mosquito performed its first US flight from Paine Field in Washington State.

As previously reported, the aircraft (previously TV959) is a TIII trainer previously held by the Imperial War Museum. It arrived at the FHCAM’s Everett, Washington facility in December after being fully restored by Avspecs Ltd. of Ardmore, New Zealand.

The machine performed its first post restoration flight from Ardmore last September wearing the temporary markings of NZ2337/TE757, a Standard Motors-built Mossie that was destroyed in a hangar fire at Ohakea in 1950. It was then disassembled and shipped to its new home in the US, where it was repainted to represent NS838, “Wag’s War-Wagon”, the machine in which Flight Officer Alan Wagner of No. 605 Squadron became an ace in March 1944.

Friday’s test flight went smoothly and was captured in the video below. The public will reportedly have a chance to see it in action at FHCAM’s SkyFair on July 22.

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The Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum’s newly restored de Havilland Mosquito has performed its first engine test since arriving at the museum’s Everett, Washington facility in December.

As previously reported, the aircraft (previously TV959) is a TIII trainer previously held by the Imperial War Museum. It was fully restored by Avspecs Ltd. of Ardmore, New Zealand and painted in the temporary markings of NZ2337/TE757, a Standard Motors-built Mossie that was destroyed in a hangar fire at Ohakea in 1950.

The machine performed its first post restoration flight from Ardmore last September before being disassembled and shipped to its new home in the US. Since its arrival, the Mosquito has been repainted to represent NS838, “Wag’s War-Wagon”, the machine in which Flight Officer Alan Wagner of No. 605 Squadron became an ace in March 1944.

Check out the video below to watch the recent engine test. The public will reportedly have a chance to see it in flight at FHCAM’s SkyFair on July 22.

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The Flying Heritage Collection (FHC) based at Paine Field in Washington State has taken delivery of their newly restored de Havilland Mosquito, seen above during an initial taxi test following restoration by Avspecs Ltd in New Zealand.

The aircraft, TIII trainer TV959, arrived in a shipping container and is in the process of being unpacked. The fuselage has already been placed on display in the FHC hangar and the assembly process is expected to begin shortly.

As previously reported, the Mosquito performed its first post-restoration flight from Ardmore, New Zealand on September 26th while temporarily wearing the markings of NZ2337/TE757, a Standard Motors-built Mossie that was destroyed in a hangar fire at Ohakea in 1950. The machine was previously held by the Imperial War Museum in the 1960s and appeared in the movie 633 Squadron in 1963.

Currently, there is no set date for the Mosquito’s first US flight.

Click below to view a photo and video of the aircraft’s arrival at its new home.

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Earlier today, Avspecs’ latest de Havilland Mosquito restoration was rolled out from its hangar at Ardmore, New Zealand for engine and taxi tests.

The aircraft has been painted in the colors of NZ2337/TE757, a Standard Motors-built Mossie that was destroyed in a hangar fire at Ohakea in 1950. The machine’s first flight is expected to occur soon, although the tests apparently revealed some engine issues that require correction.

As previously reported, the aircraft, previously TV959, is a TIII trainer being restored for the Flying Heritage Collection based at Paine Field, Washington State. It will be dismantled and shipped following flight testing. The machine was previously held by the Imperial War Museum in the 1960s and appeared in the movie 633 Squadron in 1963.

Click here to check out video of today’s test.

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Biggin Hill Heritage Hangar in Westerham, England has announced that they have been commissioned, in association with Avspecs in New Zealand, to restore a de Havilland Mosquito to airworthy condition to be based at Biggin Hill.

Additional details have not yet been released, but will “follow soon”.

Avspecs recently completed the restoration of an award winning Mosquito for the Military Aviation Museum in Virginia.

(via Biggin Hill Heritage Hangar)

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The Historical Aviation Film Unit posted a new video showing extreme close-ups of a de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito performing a high speed flyby as well as several landings with warbird pilots Keith Skilling and Dave Phillips at the controls.

The aircraft, owned by Jerry Yagen and based at the Military Aviation Museum in Virginia Beach, Virginia, has become a sensation in the warbird community since being restored by New Zealand-based Avspecs, Ltd. and was awarded Best Restoration, a Golden Wrench and Grand Champion at AirVenture 2015.

Click the link below to check it out.

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Over the weekend, de Havilland Mosquito KA114 was awarded Best Restoration, a Golden Wrench and Grand Champion at AirVenture 2015 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The machine, which is owned by Jerry Yagen and based at the Military Aviation Museum (MAM) in Virginia Beach, Virginia was restored over an eight year period by New Zealand-based Avspecs, Ltd. who finished the “Wooden Wonder” with markings representing 487 Squadron of the Royal New Zealand Air Force.

KA114 is currently the only airworthy Mosquito in the world, and has become a featured attraction at MAM’s annual Warbirds Over The Beach events.

Click the link below to check out some close-up images of the machine’s cockpit.

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