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Fantasy of Flight owner Kermit Weeks has announced plans to bring four of his WW1 aircraft reproductions to the 2018 AirVenture fly-in in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

The machines include his TVAL-built Sopwith Snipe and Albatros D.Va, a newly restored Sopwith Pup which is currently undergoing repairs following an “unfortunate incident” during its maiden flight, and his new Fokker D.VII, which was recently completed by noted WW1 aircraft builder Fred Murrin.

It appears that the Snipe is the only machine that could take flight at the event, as the remaining aircraft have not yet amassed the required 10 hrs of flight time, or are currently involved in ongoing maintenance. Click below to check out the update.

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The decade-long restoration of the XP-82 Twin Mustang prototype (S/N 44-83887, seen above) is nearing completion, and the team behind the project is hoping that it will be ready in time for a planned debut at AirVenture 2018.

As previously reported, the F-82 long-range escort fighter was designed late in WW2 and became the last propeller-driven fighter produced in quantity for the U.S. Air Force. Tom Reilly of Douglas, Georgia acquired the XP-82 prototype from Walter and Margaret Soplata in 2008 and restoration to airworthy condition began that July at Douglas Municipal Airport. Additional F-82 parts were sourced from Alaska and Colorado and a rare, left-hand turning Allison V-12 was located in Mexico. Additional components, including full second cockpit controls and a second canopy (one that “is completely different from any P-51 type”) were sourced from San Francisco and Tampa, respectively.

Interest in the restoration of this exceedingly rare machine has been high, and Reilly states that “There is no better place than Oshkosh to make the first public flights of this aircraft, which is why it is our intent to complete the restoration and testing so we can be a part of AirVenture 2018.”

The AirVenture fly-in is scheduled to take place at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisconsin from July 23-29.

(via EAA)

Jack Bally’1/3 scale, manned B-17G reproduction will reportedly attend the AirVenture 2018 fly-in this summer.

The Illinois-based machine was built over a 17 year period using 1/9 scale RC model aircraft plans and carries a single pilot. It is powered by four Hirth 3002 4-cylinder 2-stroke engines, spans 34′ 7″ and weighs an estimated 1,800 lbs empty – a far cry from the full-scale machine’s 36,134 lb weight. It received its airworthiness certification in October 2016 and performed its maiden flight on November 14th of that year.

The aircraft, also known as “Obsession,” is expected to be on display throughout the week, during which time it will reportedly be alternated between between Boeing Plaza and the Replica Fighters Association. Exact details will be announced as the event draws closer.

AirVenture 2018 is scheduled to take place at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisconsin from July 23-29.

(via EAA Photo via Bally Bomber)

This year’s EAA AirVenture fly-in will reportedly commemorate the final year of WW1 with period aircraft, flying displays and activities.

Related activities will reportedly take place throughout the week, with a special emphasis on Friday, July 27. Among the aircraft slated to appear at the event is a rare 1915 Bleriot reproduction in Royal Flying Corps colors, aircraft from the Kermit Weeks/Fantasy of Flight collection and a original Dayton-Wright DH.4 currently under restoration by the nonprofit “Friends of Jenny” along with Tennessee high school students.

The WWI programming will be primarily based in the vintage aircraft parking area on the AirVenture flightline. Along with the aircraft on display from the 1915-1918 era, there will be WWI re-enactors and static engine runs. In addition, WWI-era aircraft, aircraft owners, and historians will participate in forums and Vintage in Review session throughout the week. A number of the aircraft will also be displayed at various times on AirVenture’s showcase Boeing Plaza.

AirVenture 2018 is scheduled to take place from July 23-29 at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Additional details will reportedly be announced as they are finalized.

(via EAA Top Photo: Kermit Weeks Hangar)

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The U.S.-based “Friends of Jenny” nonprofit organization has unveiled its newly restored de Havilland DH.4.

As previously reported, the machine, which is believed to be the last DH.4 airframe in North America, has been restored to airworthy condition in order to “honor the memory of the Americans who built her, who flew in her, and who died in her.”

The project saw the aircraft restored by “cadres of professionals and aficionados” and was endorsed by the WW1 Centennial Commission. The final product boasts a V-12 Liberty engine and markings representing DH.4 #6 of 50 Squadron, the machine flown by Lt. Harold E. Goettler and Lt. Erwin R. Bleckley when they gave their lives during a heroic mission on September 12, 1918, posthumously earning them both the Medal of Honor. [click to continue…]

As Kermit Weeks prepares to bring four of his WW1 aircraft to the upcoming AirVenture Fly-in, he recently returned his Sopwith Snipe to the air for the first time in five years, documenting the event in a newly released video.

The aircraft was constructed by The Vintage Aviator, Ltd in New Zealand and is powered by a Bentley BR2 rotary engine. It represents the early incarnation of the Snipe, which employed a smaller rudder and lacked the large, balanced ailerons seen on later models. The markings represent E8102, flown by Maj. W.G. Barker during his lone encounter with 60 Fokker D.VIIs on October 27, 1918, during which he managed to shoot down four aircraft before crash landing over Allied lines with severe wounds. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions and the fuselage of his original machine is now preserved at the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa. [click to continue…]