Search: National Museum of Nuclear Science

The National Museum of Nuclear Science & History in Albuquerque is planning to restore New Mexico’s only Boeing B-47E Stratojet, which is currently part of their nine-acre outdoor exhibit area.

The machine (S/N 53-2280) was constructed by Boeing in 1955 and went on to serve mainly as a test bed for “fly-by-wire” technology. Following removal from the USAF inventory in 1969, it was transferred from the USAF Heritage Museum program, and in 2013 arrived at its current home at the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History.

One of only 23 examples of the type remaining, the museum’s B-47 has become part of “Operation Preservation,” a multi-year campaign to refurbish the collection’s iconic aircraft residing on outdoor display. The effort will reportedly begin this month under the supervision of Brigadier General (Ret.) Jay Bledsoe, Restoration Project Manager, and include bodywork and a new coat of primer and paint. [click to continue…]

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The planned exterior restoration of the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History’s B-52B Stratofortress has received in an encouraging show of support that will allow work to begin in the near future.

Last month, the museum initiated a fundraising campaign which raised $28,840 from 177 contributors. Although this was short of the $60,000 goal, the museum made up the difference, and then some, via 77 direct donations totaling more than $38,000.

As previously reported, the The aircraft, SN 52-0013, is one of only four B models on display anywhere in the world, and also served as “the first to air drop a hydrogen bomb and the only B-52B left in existence that has dropped atomic weapons – all during testing”.

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The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History in Albuquerque, New Mexico has launched a crowdfunding campaign aimed at restoring a historic B-52B Stratofortress.

The aircraft, SN 52-0013, is one of only four B models on display anywhere in the world. The bomber also served as “the first to air drop a hydrogen bomb and the only B-52B left in existence that has dropped atomic weapons – all during testing”.

The restoration is expected to cost $120,000, and the museum is hoping to raise half of the needed funds via crowdfunding. This will cover the costs of preparing and painting the airframe, including the application of the “Air Force Special Weapons Center” insignia on the starboard side and “Air Force Systems Command” on the port side.

The project is part of the museum’s Operation Preservation project which seeks to repaint and refurbish aircraft based at the nine acre facility. Click the link below to learn more.

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After successfully funding a Kickstarter campaign, The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History in Albuquerque, New Mexico has begun performing cosmetic restoration work on their B-29 Superfortress (S/N 45-21748).

This particular aircraft never saw combat in WW2, as it wasn’t delivered to the Army Air Corps until August 9, 1945 – the same day the second atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan. Instead, it was used for nuclear weapons testing in the late 1940s before being retired for display at Chanute AFB in Illinois. The National Museum of Nuclear Science & History acquired the aircraft in 1993.

According to project leader Jerry Hanks, the B-29 restoration will be historically accurate and follow guidelines set by the USAF and the Smithsonian Institution. New windows will be installed, as well as lighting, and the bomber will be repainted to protect it from the elements and reflect its appearance while serving with the 509th Bombardment Group in Roswell.

A team of 50 volunteers have already logged more than 2,000 hours on the project, and painting of the airframe is now underway. It is hoped that the process will be completed by August 9, 2015, in order to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the end of WWII as well as the anniversary of the machine’s delivery from Boeing to the Army Air Corps.

Click the link below to check out local news coverage of the restoration.

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