Search: Luftfahrttechnische Museum

The latest arrival at the Luftfahrttechnische (LTM) Museum in Rechlin, Germany is a MiG-21 cutaway display, which arrived earlier today on a flatbed truck.

Like several other aircraft in the collection, the MiG was offered on loan by the Militärhistorisches Museum in Berlin (where it is seen on display in the photo above). LTM is especially excited about this aircraft, as its cutaway appearance provides visitors with insights into the structures and systems employed in a combat aircraft.

The MiG will reportedly be placed in LTM’s new exhibition hall after flooring is installed, and thanks to a custom chassis that allows the fuselage to stand alone without its wings attached, the machine can simply be pushed into the area and assembled when the time comes.

The new hall is currently scheduled to open on August 19th. Click below to check out photos of the MiG’s arrival.

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The Luftfahrttechnische Museum in Rechlin, Germany has taken delivery of their latest aircraft, a replica of the legendary Fokker Dr.1.

The triplane is one of several aircraft loaned to the collection by the Militärhistorisches Museum in Berlin and wears the colors of 152/17 flown by Manfred von Richthofen (aka “The Red Baron”) in early 1918. The original aircraft survived WW1 and was displayed in the Zeughaus museum in Berlin, but was ultimately destroyed in a bombing raid during the Second World War.

The replica arrived at the museum without its Oberursel rotary engine or a propeller, both of which reportedly remained in Berlin. To remedy the situation, staff will be looking to borrow or buy examples for the display, and are seeking the public’s help in the endeavour.

Click here to view additional photos.

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The Luftfahrttechnische Museum in Rechlin, Germany is welcoming more WW1 aircraft to its collection with today’s arrival of a Rumpler Stahltaube.

The aircraft is one of several on loan to the collection from the Militärhistorisches Museum in Berlin. Previous arrivals included a Messerschmitt Bf 109 G2, Siemens-Schuckert D.III, Fokker E.III and Fokker D.VII.

The Taube was originally designed by Igo Etrich and first flew in 1910. Its most recognizable feature was its unique wing shape, which was derived from the Zanonia Macrocarpa – a seed known for its lengthy gliding distances. The design went through many incarnations, including an example built with steel tubing that became known as the “Stahltaube”. Over the course of its service, the Taube was used for training and reconnaissance purposes by Italy, Germany and Austro-Hungary.

Due to the size of the wing panels, only one was delivered along with the fuselage, the second will reportedly arrive next month along with a Fokker Dr.1.

Click below to view additional photos.

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The Luftfahrttechnische Museum in Rechlin, Germany has reported the arrival of three new WW1 aircraft exhibits, including a Fokker E.III, Junkers D.I and Siemens-Schuckert D.III.

The three aircraft were loaned by Militärhistorisches Museum in Berlin, who previously loaned the collection a Fokker D.VII and Messerschmitt Bf 109 G2. The new additions have been placed in storage and will eventually be displayed in a new exhibition hall which is slated for completion early next year.

Click below to view additional photos of the arrivals.

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The Luftfahrttechnische Museum in Rechlin, Germany has added a full-scale Fokker D.VII replica to its collection.

The aircraft was loaned by the Militärhistorisches Museum in Berlin, along with a Messerschmitt Bf 109 G2, earlier this year and was trucked to Rechlin before being reassembled at the museum’s entrance. The display will help provide a chronology of aviation in Rechlin, where the D.VII was tested and refined.

Click here to view additional photos.